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Buddhist research team “It has as big an impact as age, gender, and genetics… BMI and cytomegalovirus risk factors.”

(Seoul = Larose.VIP) Reporter Jooyoung Lee = Research has shown that cigarette smoking has as great an impact as age, gender, and genetic factors on the body’s immune response to invading pathogens such as bacteria and viruses, and that this effect can persist for years even after quitting smoking. .

Cigarettes on display at a large supermarket

Cigarettes on display at a large supermarket

On the 15th, Dr. Dara Duffy’s team at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, France, investigated the impact of environmental factors on the variability of immune responses among 1,000 people in the scientific journal Nature, and found that smoking, latent cytomegalovirus infection, and body mass index were (BMI) was found to have a significant impact.

The immune response that occurs when pathogens such as bacteria and viruses invade varies greatly from person to person, and age, gender, and genetic factors play an important role in the variability of the immune response. However, the variables that cause differences in secretion of cytokines that regulate immune responses have not yet been clearly identified.

In this study, the research team focused on cytokines secreted when exposed to pathogens to identify environmental factors that influence the variability of responses to immune stimulation.

In the Millieu Interior (MI) project, which studies the interaction of genes and environment and their effects on the immune system, 1,000 participants were exposed to 11 immune agents for 22 hours and then tested for different concentrations of 13 disease-related cytokines. We measured how this changed and compared it to a control group that was not exposed to the immune agent.

As a result, among the environmental factors studied, smoking was found to have the greatest impact on the immune response. Smoking has been found to affect not only innate immunity, which determines the general immune response, but also acquired immunity, which responds to pathogen invasion.

Although the effect of smoking on innate immunity is temporary and disappears after smoking cessation, the effect on acquired adaptive immunity persists for years after smoking and appears to change cytokine secretion in the event of infection or other immune problems.

The research team found that the difference in immune response due to smoking was as large as the difference due to factors that cannot be modified, such as age, gender, and genetic factors.

In addition, this study found that, in addition to smoking, body mass index (BMI, calculated by dividing body weight by the square of height) and latent infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), which is not a big problem for normal people but can have serious effects on AIDS patients or newborns, also increases cytokine secretion. was found to have a significant impact on

The research team said that the results of this study provide new insight into the impact of smoking on human health and a better understanding of how modifiable environmental factors affect the variability of the immune response. Understanding how these variables affect the immune response can lead to treatments and treatments. He said vaccine design could be improved.

Dr. Yang Ruo’s team from the Institute of Rheumatology at the University of Oxford, UK, said in an accompanying commentary (News & Views), “This study shows that smoking affects specific immune responses, just like aging or genetics, and that the effects persist long after smoking cessation.” “This provides another scientific basis for quitting smoking and choosing a healthy lifestyle,” he said.

◆ 출처 : Nature, Darragh Duffy et al., ‘Smoking changes adaptive immunity with persistent effects’, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-023-06968-8

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Report to KakaoTalk okjebo 2024/02/15 05:00 Sent

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