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facial flushing

facial flushing

(Seoul = Larose.VIP) Reporter Han Seong-gan = A study showed that postmenopausal women with a history of migraines and experiencing vasomotor symptoms have a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke.

Vasomotor symptoms include facial flushing and night sweats that appear after menopause. Facial flushing is a condition where the face turns red and feels hot, and nocturnal sweating is a symptom of excessive sweating while sleeping at night.

Professor Catherine Kim’s research team at the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Epidemiology at the University of Michigan Medical School analyzed data from 1,954 women (ages 18 to 30 to early 60s) among the participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Study in Adolescence (CARDIA), and found these findings. This was revealed, HealthDay News reported on the 15th.

Of these, 81 developed cardiovascular disease. Among them, 42 suffered a stroke.

The research team found that postmenopausal women with a history of migraines and persistent vasomotor symptoms had a 51% higher risk of cardiovascular disease than other women. In particular, the risk of stroke was 70% higher.

The research team explained that although the risk of cardiovascular disease did not increase if only migraine and vasomotor symptoms were present, the overlap between a history of migraine and vasomotor symptoms in middle age could become a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

The research team emphasized that these results took into account cardiovascular disease risk factors such as high blood pressure and dyslipidemia.

In response, Dr. Stephanie Povion of the North American Menopause Society said there is an urgent need to improve women’s current cardiovascular disease risk-prediction models.

The findings are important because migraines and hot flashes are so common in women, he added.

He pointed out that nearly 8 out of 10 postmenopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, and migraines occur in about 17.5% of women who have reached the terminal reproductive stage.

Therefore, when assessing women’s cardiovascular disease risk, a history of migraines and persistent vasomotor symptoms should be considered as women-specific risk factors, he emphasized.

The results of this study were published in the latest issue of Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

skhan@yna.co.kr

Report to KakaoTalk okjebo 2024/02/16 10:46 Sent

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