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Overwhelming visual beauty, quick plot… The story is reminiscent of imperialism and religious war.

A scene from the movie 'Dune: Part 2'

A scene from the movie ‘Dune: Part 2’

(Seoul = Larose.VIP) Reporter Oh Bo-ram = American writer Frank Herbert’s space opera saga ‘Dune’ is considered the work that has had the greatest influence on science fiction content around the world.

From ‘Star Wars’ to ‘Game of Thrones’, numerous contents have borrowed settings or ideas from this novel.

However, ironically, there were also claims that it was close to impossible to translate ‘Dune’ into a movie.

This was because not only was it difficult to embody the vast world view and story called ‘Duniverse’ through video, but if it was shown in 2 to 3 hours, it would inevitably end up being a useless movie.

In fact, director David Lynch left a stain on his career when he squeezed ‘Dune’ into a two-hour film in 1984. In the film world, the perception that ‘Dune’ is a poisoned chalice has become more widespread.

Then, Hollywood’s next great director, Denis Villeneuve, issued a challenge. He made a smart choice to divide the contents of Part 1 of the novel into Parts 1 and 2 of the movie.

The novel depicts the fight between those trying to seize power against the background of a future society where the emperor, the great families, the aristocratic alliance, and the space development company are closely connected.

In the first part of ‘Dune’, which will be released in theaters in 2021, Paul (Timothée Chalamet), the heir of the Atreides family, witnesses the extinction of the family and then visits the Fremen, an indigenous people of Arrakis, the producer of the rare resource ‘spice’, and becomes one of their members. This is what it looks like.

The second part, which is about to be released, follows the process of Paul’s transformation from a warrior to a leader and then to a messiah or fanatic. Part 1 feels like a prologue to show the ‘real story’ and a build-up to imprint Paul’s changes.

A scene from the movie 'Dune: Part 2'

A scene from the movie ‘Dune: Part 2’

In Part 2, director Villeneuve also does not spend time explaining the worldview of ‘Dune’ one by one. Instead, he presents the world of ‘Dune’ to the audience with overwhelming visual beauty.

Following Part 1, the main setting of Part 2 is Arrakis, a desert planet called ‘Dune’. The hills that sink your feet and the harsh sandstorms that block your vision are depicted in great detail, making you feel like you are on a planet in the distant future. The realism was doubled thanks to filming with IMAX cameras in Jordan and the United Arab Emirates.

Director Villeneuve’s unique melancholic visual aesthetic, shown through his previous works ‘Scorched Love’ (2010), ‘Sicario: City of Assassins’ (2015), ‘Contact’ (2016), and ‘Blade Runner 2049’ (2017), is reflected in ‘Dune’. 2′ also shines.

Dry colors, concrete buildings that show off their grandeur, and strange-looking space weapons are the mise-en-scène that represent the identity of ‘Dune.’

The dystopian color reaches its peak when the Harkonnen family’s planet is shown.

A new character, sociopath Fade Lothar (Austin Butler), sets the mood. He mercilessly slaughters the last three Atreides in a stadium reminiscent of the Colosseum of the Roman Empire, and the crowd who sees this goes wild and cheers.

Unlike the first film, which presented a spectacle with a minimum number of people, the second film steals attention with these distraction tactics.

There is also a ‘herd fight’ between the Fremen and Harkonnen in the latter half of the film, and the highlight is the scene where a group of Fremen led by Paul crushes the enemy while riding a giant sand bug.

A scene from the movie 'Dune: Part 2'

A scene from the movie ‘Dune: Part 2’

The long running time of 2 hours and 46 minutes goes by quickly due to the rush of action and fast-paced development.

The story is also not light and leaves you with a lot to think about.

The fight between those in power for resources and the people in resource-producing areas being relegated to ‘second-class citizens’ seem to intersect with the history of imperialism.

The narrative of the main character, Paul, can be read as a person following fate and finding his own path, but it also hints at what happens when a charismatic leader encounters religion. It shows Paul abandoning his former self due to the blindness of the Fremen who firmly believe that Paul is their savior.

However, it is disappointing that this process does not unfold as smoothly as it should. Paul’s growth process and psychological changes come somewhat suddenly. It seems that there is also a lack of physical time to go through the main character’s narrative step by step.

Director Villeneuve is also planning to film the second part of the novel, ‘The Messiah of Dune.’ I’m curious to see if Paul’s story will be told in part 3.

Released on the 28th. 166 minutes. Suitable for ages 12 and older.

A scene from the movie 'Dune: Part 2'

A scene from the movie ‘Dune: Part 2’

rambo@yna.co.kr

Report to KakaoTalk okjebo 2024/02/22 02:00 Sent

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