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Despite the government’s ‘license suspension and detention’ policy, more than 70% of the total submitted resignation letters.

Patient with leg necrosis ‘runs and runs’ for over 3 hours… Medical staff remaining at the scene complained of “work overload”

Patient heading to ambulance for medical treatment

Patient heading to ambulance for medical treatment

(Seoul = Larose.VIP) Reporter Seongho Seong = Despite the government’s strict response policy such as “suspension of license” and “arrest and investigation,” the departure of residents from hospitals is expected to continue for the fourth day on the 23rd.

While doctors’ opposition to the government’s push to increase medical schools grows stronger, the ‘groans’ of patients and medical staff protecting the field are deepening.

According to the government on the 23rd, 9,275 people submitted resignation letters as of the 21st at the 100 major teaching hospitals where most of the medical residents work.

Since the total size of the major is 13,000, more than 7 out of 10 students have submitted their resignation.

The number of residents who left their workplace at these 100 hospitals was 8,024, an increase of 211 from the day before.

The Ministry of Health and Welfare has put pressure on residents who have not returned to work despite orders to resume work by suspending their medical licenses, and the Ministry of Justice has put pressure on residents by insisting on the principle of “detainment and investigation” of those instituting collective action, but the number of residents leaving their patients continues to increase. .

The Korean Medical Association (KMA), a consultative body of senior doctors, is supporting the submission of resignation letters by residents, saying, “This is not a group action. It is a free decision of juniors, and we support this.”

As the tense standoff between the government and medical groups continues, patients are bearing the brunt of the ‘medical crisis’.

Vacancies in specialization, burden on the medical staff left behind

Vacancies in specialization, burden on the medical staff left behind

Major large hospitals in Seoul are closely monitoring the situation, reducing overall surgeries by at least 30% to 50% due to the large-scale departure of residents.

Each hospital is mobilizing full-time doctors and professors to fill vacancies for residents. We are placing professors on night duty, etc., but I think it will be difficult to endure if the situation prolongs.

An official from one of the ‘Big 5’ hospitals said, “The next week to 10 days could be a critical time,” and expressed concern, “After that, it will become uncontrollably difficult.”

A patient who had stage 3 rectal cancer and underwent surgery at Severance Hospital last year, but the cancer metastasized to the liver two months after the end of chemotherapy and was scheduled for surgery, said, “I was hospitalized on the 20th and was scheduled to have surgery on the 21st, but it was canceled.” “I’m so scared and scared that I’ll miss out and have to go for a liver transplant,” he said.

In rural areas, there were cases of patients wandering hundreds of kilometers because they could not find an emergency room where they could receive treatment.

According to the Gangwon Provincial Fire Department, at around 11:30 a.m. on the 21st, Mr. A, in his 60s and suffering from diabetes, developed severe necrosis on his right leg and called 119 for help. When the hospital recommended transfer, saying surgery would be difficult due to the absence of a specialist, he ended up walking down the street. There was a case where a person was treated after wandering for 3 hours and 30 minutes.

Medical staff remaining on site are also suffering from workload.

A medical staff member at Chonnam National University Hospital in Gwangju said, “Things are different for each hospital, but there are male nurses who have to do the work of inserting indwelling urinary catheters (urine lines) that residents used to do.” He added, “It’s natural that they have to work extra hours, and time for lunch is running out.” .

Another medical staff member said, “I think the best (solution) is to reduce policy conflicts with the government and have residents return to work as soon as possible.”

soho@yna.co.kr

Report to KakaoTalk okjebo 2024/02/23 05:00 Sent

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