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“The workload has doubled and I can’t even open my eyes… All that’s left is Bodhisattva.”

One professor covers 3 to 4 wards… Concerns about the prolongation of the situation

Vacancies in specialization, burden on the medical staff left behind

Vacancies in specialization, burden on the medical staff left behind

(Seoul = Larose.VIP) Reporter Kim Jeong-jin and Lee Mi-ryeong = “The number of patients has decreased, but the work has doubled. I just hope that this situation will end as soon as possible.”

A nurse I met at Seoul National University Hospital in Jongno-gu, Seoul on the morning of the 23rd said that the workload had increased significantly due to the mass resignation of residents.

He said, “Many patients have been discharged or moved to other hospitals, so there are almost no people left in the hospital rooms.” He added, “Hospitalized patients and their guardians are anxious and are asking for various things, so the workload has increased significantly.”

He continued, “It’s the same for the nurses, but the remaining professors seem to be having a harder time because they have to cover three to four wards on their own.”

As it has been four days since residents left the medical field in protest against the government’s decision to increase the number of medical students by 2,000, the fatigue of medical staff who have to fill the vacant positions is increasing.

As residents, the ‘core personnel’ responsible for emergency duty and surgical assistance, are leaving the medical field en masse, major large hospitals in Seoul are reducing the total number of surgeries by 30-50% and mobilizing full-time doctors (fellows) and professors. .

Nurses are also taking on the duties of existing majors.

The problem is that as the situation prolongs, the remaining medical staff’s stamina may be depleted to the point where they can no longer endure. There are also concerns in the medical community that the end of this month could be a critical moment when even the remaining fourth-year residents leave.

On this day, the medical staff going to and from the main building of Seoul National University Hospital were busy pacing each other. It was also common to see patients or their guardians greeting doctors by saying, “Are you busy these days?”

The doctors walking together, holding coffee in one hand, exchanged stories about the increase in work burden due to the large number of residents disappearing from the medical field, and then smiled helplessly, saying, “What remains is Bodhisattva.”

A specialist I met at the main building of Seoul National University Hospital was asked if it was difficult because there were no residents, and he pressed his hand against his floating head and answered briefly, “It’s just as it appeared in the media. It’s true that it’s a lot of physical strain.”

Another specialist who said he was affiliated with the Department of Radiology said, “The workload has increased, but I am persevering and working hard because I support the will of my major. I am going to work hard with the mindset that I will persevere even if it means sacrificing my body.”

He said, “The radiology department’s workload has increased by about 120% compared to usual (after the mass resignation of residents), and the internal medicine, surgery, and surgery departments have increased by about 150-200%.” ​​He added, “I don’t know if it can continue like this, but this situation “We are all prepared for it to last for more than a month,” he said.

Vacancies in specialization, burden on the medical staff left behind

Vacancies in specialization, burden on the medical staff left behind

The situation was similar at Samsung Seoul Hospital in Gangnam-gu.

The medical staff I met at the hospital that day said they felt sorry for the patients suffering inconvenience due to the ‘medical crisis’, but expressed a strong stance that they could not agree with the government’s policy.

An ophthalmologist I met in the ward of the main building of Samsung Seoul Hospital in Gangnam-gu hurriedly said, “I’m so busy that I don’t have time to talk.”

When asked about the hospital situation, another medical staff member said, “Is the situation good? I’m tired.” He sighed deeply, rubbing his sleepy eyes, and added, “It’s true that I get mixed feelings when I read articles about the patients’ situation.”

The Ministry of Health and Welfare announced that as of 10 p.m. on the 22nd, 8,897 people, or about 78.5% of residents at 94 major hospitals, had submitted resignation letters.

According to the Korean Nurses Association, as of 6 p.m. on the 22nd, a total of 134 reports were received at the ‘Field Nurse Difficulty Reporting Center’ operated by the association.

stopn@yna.co.kr

Report to KakaoTalk okjebo 2024/02/23 11:44 Sent

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