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Experts say, “The government must come up with an alternative that can lead to a soft landing”

The resident said, “If you want to fight, you have to go back to the hospital and talk to the government.”

There is no disagreement about the ‘shortage of 10,000 doctors’… “For a soft landing, we need to consider readjusting the size of the reinforcements.”

The embers of the medical crisis that will not go out

The embers of the medical crisis that will not go out

(Seoul = Larose.VIP) Reporter Kim Jan-di and Seo Hye-rim = As the conflict between the government and the medical community over the increase in medical schools reaches a boiling point, voices are growing inside and outside the medical community that both sides should stop confronting each other and resolve the issue through dialogue.

According to the medical community, academia, and civil society groups on the 25th, as the medical vacuum caused by the mass resignation of medical residents is growing day by day, a consensus is forming that the conflict must be resolved quickly to prevent further damage to patients.

The main suggestion is that residents should return to the patients’ side and engage in dialogue with the government, and that the government should listen to the voices of the medical community and open a ‘retreat route’ to prevent the situation from prolonging too long.

Kwon Yong-jin, a professor at the Public Medical Center at Seoul National University Hospital, emphasized that both residents and the government should engage in dialogue.

He advised that if medical residents truly want to ‘fight’, they must have a deep understanding of the problems the government is concerned about and be able to come up with policy alternatives.

He said, “I hope (the residents) will return to the hospital and talk with the government,” and pointed out, “The government also said it had sufficient consultations with the medical community, but there was a lack of public discussion with the public and society regarding the number of 2,000 people.”

Professor Kwon is not opposed to increasing the number of medical schools, but his position is that it is not possible without bold investments to expand medical school education infrastructure.

He said, “First of all, it seems necessary to create a ‘rule’ regarding the number of students between the government and the medical community,” and added, “There should also be an effort to adjust the amount of medical school increase requested by each university president to suit reality.”

Regarding the medical community’s refusal to accept the government’s essential medical policy package, saying it lacks specificity, Professor Kwon said that it would be enough for the ‘Medical Reform Special Committee’ to create a detailed roadmap.

As the government has drawn up a big picture to strengthen compensation, such as increasing the fee for essential medical services, it is a matter of discussion in the future in a special committee with participation from both inside and outside of the medical community. In fact, the government is also emphasizing that it will work with the medical community to develop a detailed plan for the essential medical policy package.

Statement calling for expansion of essential, regional, and public medical care in hospitals

Statement calling for expansion of essential, regional, and public medical care in hospitals

It was also pointed out that it would be wasteful for the government and the medical community to repeat each other’s claims without backing down even an inch. Concerns were also raised that the longer the issue goes on, the more it may degenerate into a ‘power struggle’ with only hurt feelings.

Lee Byeong-hoon, professor emeritus of sociology at Chung-Ang University, said, “In order to avoid kneeling down on someone, ‘behind the scenes dialogue’ is important.” “It has to be done,” he said.

Professor Lee expressed concern, saying, “If things continue the way they are now, the ‘emotional backlash’ will be stronger than the practical dialogue, and the doctors will be even more united and the situation will become more uneasy.”

Each of the researchers who wrote the three reports that the government used as the basis for the 2,000-person increase had no disagreement that there was a shortage of 10,000 doctors.

However, in response to the conflict between the government and the medical community over increasing the number of medical schools, it was suggested to consider alternatives such as adjusting the speed of the policy or discussing the acceptable size.

Shin Young-seok, a research professor at Korea University’s Graduate School of Public Health, said, “The two sides should not go to extremes. We need to think about a soft landing by increasing the number of people (10,000) by 1,000 a year for 10 years.”

Lee Cheol-hee, a professor in the Department of Economics at Seoul National University, said, “Even if the goal is the same, the paths to get there can be diverse.” He added, “Rather than increasing the number of people by 2,000 for five years, we can increase the number of people by 1,000 for a longer period of time, or look at the long term until 2050 and increase the number of people to 22,000.” “We can also consider ways to increase it,” he said.

He said, “One way (to end the standoff) is for medical groups to start by presenting specific alternatives (regarding increased troops).”

Patient heading to ambulance for medical treatment

Patient heading to ambulance for medical treatment

Hong Yun-cheol, a professor of preventive medicine at Seoul National University College of Medicine, said, “The region should have (education) conditions that can accommodate students, but that is not possible, so it would be better to switch to a policy of increasing the number of doctors within the acceptable range.” “Rather than increasing 2,000 troops, it would be acceptable to increase troops by about 750,” he said.

There were also bitter calls for both the government and the medical community to think of patients first.

Ahn Seon-young, director of the Severe Illness Patients Association, pointed out, “Both the government and the Korean Medical Association have abandoned patients. It is also problematic that the Korean Medical Association and the government are sitting at the (discussion) table while excluding the patients who are still suffering the most.”

Na Young-myeong, planning director of the Health and Medical Workers’ Union, also said, “If we don’t talk, we can’t get an answer,” and suggested, “The medical community and the government should talk, and at the same time, engage in social dialogue to create a detailed plan for the essential medical policy package.”

Some even suggested that doctors who lose their cause ‘the moment they leave the patient’ should eventually take a step back.

Jeong Seong-seong, a professor at the Department of Health Administration at Yonsei University, said, “We cannot continue in this situation indefinitely, and we have no choice but to eventually step back from the side that has no justification.” He added, “How can we leave patients just because we increase the number of medical schools? Doctors should return first. “It has to be done,” he said.

jandi@yna.co.kr

Report to KakaoTalk okjebo 2024/02/25 06:11 Sent

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